consens asupra faptului că albinele nu s-au otrăvit singure

S-a publicat și mega-studiul despre efectul pesticidelor neonicotinoide asupra albinelor: Country-specific effects of neonicotinoid pesticides on honey bees and wild bees.

Taken together, our results suggest that exposure to neonicotinoid seed treatments can have negative effects on the interannual reproductive potential of both wild and managed bees, but that these effects are not consistent across countries. The country-specific responses of honey bees and bumble bees strongly suggest that the effects of neonicotinoids are a product of interacting factors (20–23). This study has identified between-country differences in the use of oilseed rape crop as a forage resource for bees (affecting exposure to crop residues) and incidence of disease within hives. Both factors were higher for Hungarian and U.K. honey bees (tables S10 and S11). Overall neonicotinoid residues were detected infrequently and rarely exceeded 1.5 ng g−1 (w/w). As such, direct mortality effects caused by exposure to high concentrations of neonicotinoids are likely to be rare (table S12). However, our results suggest that exposure to low levels of neonicotinoids may cause reductions in hive fitness that are influenced by a number of interacting environmental factors. Such interacting environmental factors can amplify the impact of honey bee worker losses (e.g., through sublethal toxicity effects) and reduce longer-term colony viability (4, 16). Note that our common experimental approach applied across three countries revealed varying impacts and may explain the inconsistent results of previous studies conducted in single countries or at few sites (4, 5, 8, 12, 13, 15).
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